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afternoon. they use files to share information about her and a place where she keeps her personal information. she has advanced directives, medical records, and so on that is not accessible to everybody in the network, but some of the members. there are stories and photos, a place where people can celebrate today, how to share memories, have the good times that were the essence in the past and in the present. you might be asking yourself this question, if you are a facebook user, how is different from facebook. it is what we called open social networking, and it is designed to create many relationships. this is closed and personal, it is an intimate space. i have a daughter that was close to 1000 facebook friends. it has no advertisements. no data mining, it is private and secure. it bridges the formal and informal world of care and support. and what we have discovered is that people that use a, what they get out of that is what we call the network of fact. we have jill in the center of the network and you can see on the upper side where you have a health care provider to put info
out, not only built trust between us and the afghans but it gave them the ability to prg on a daily basis. so the other frustration was the coalition effort. there was a lot of people with great intentions willing to help shared by many different countries. the frustration was many different countries, there's many different ways of doing things. so we would be out there telling the afghans, this is how you conduct police operations, this is how we do police training, this is how you hold your weapon and engage the enemy, and then several weeks later another force would come in and not that it was necessarily wrong, but it was different. so from the afghan perspective, incredibly frustrating to understand where they are going and what they need to be doing and what is right and what is wrong. so in closing if someone were to ask me from 2010 to where we're at now, is there hope i would say, yes, there is. as we stand down our combat forces and shift to an advisory and a training role i think we're going to be able to take our lessons lerbed -- learned and ensure that we can con
a, one of our breakout sessions. take this opportunity to use the west -- the restaurant and find your own way. thank you. -- rest room and find your own way. thank you. but the anniversary of the great earthquake was remembered. >> i would like to ask for a minute of silence. >> let's have a moment of silence. >> they meet for the annual reflating ceremony. he was joined by winnie for an afternoon celebration. we are here to commemorate all that it signifies. at each anniversary the leaders meet to prepare for the next great quake. bob welcome everybody to the anniversary. i got to say, the mayor gets it done. gooa round of applause for our e chief's wife. you look terrific. do we have sydney close five? -- close by. we will pass the microphone to the mayor for a couple of quick words. we have a fire chief and the police chief. >> good morning, everyone. 106 years since our earthquake. we do have a grandson? she was with us in 2009. goopublic works is here. this reminds us of the 3000 people but passed away in 1906 from the devastating earthquake, but the rebirth of our city is w
'm fredricka whitfield, and don lemon, right after sanjay gupta. >>> hello and thank you for joining us this week. i'm in northern california. i'm going to tell you there is something already in your medicine cabinet that many believe could be a cure for cancer. i'll explain it. also, i'll introduce you to a boy who was terribly bullied over a speech problem. now he found a way to help his speech issue. and a way to feel satisfied with eating. >>> we begin with marijuana, on the ballot in six states, the question is, should doctors be allowed to prescribe marijuana for medicinal use. here in california, the first medical marijuana law took effect about 16 years ago. but i'll tell you, being out here the controversy is still controversial, and it confuses many people. here to talk with us is the doctor who is the author of the pot book, a complete guide. dr. holland, thank you for joining us on the program. >> it is my pleasure, dr. gupta. >> you know, it is interesting being out here, people talk about this all the time. there are many states where this is already allowed, medicinal mar
and this offered us a venue to be able to conduct a humanitarian and disaster relief exercise with all the different partners that we had together and collaborating with this exercise, this offered a perfect opportunity for us to introduce the military capabilities and interaction in exchange with our civil military partners as well. the exercise was located on oh oahu we had used that island as a fictitious island of chianti where we wanted to do a humanitarian response but it also provided us an avenue for the state-wide partners, the civil hawaiian partners, to be able to exercise their exercise as well. this exercise also allowed us the opportunity to intro daus a lot of technology to help with the interoperatability of the civil military exercise. one of the main goals that we had for this was to allow our military a crisis response adaptive force package and opportunity to allow their training and certification in providing the most appropriate military expeditionary force for that scenario. one of the things that we realize in the military when we do these exercises in a foreig
>> welcome to city hall. thank you for joining us. thank you for coming out. i want to thank members of the board of supervisors. i want to thank them for being here in this joint recognition of our commissioners and members of 14 different bodies that will be appointed today to committees and commissions. i want to thank all the friends and family for joining us. let me say how excited i am this past week, i have been watching a certain convention. next week, we will have an even more exciting convention to watch. it is of course, in the spirit of the expected national, regional, and state elections we are preparing for. it is also a reminder of the importance of our civic duty and all the different departments we have created. public engagement is extremely important to the way we run government in san francisco. it has always been about public engagement. we need the last bodies come a different viewpoints, different economic classics -- classes, ethnicities, and regions of the city to be well-represented on everything we do because that is what makes our city great. it is
switchbacks they all know and say it's a common occurrence. when muni says they rarely use switch back it's incredulous. they feel it's a common experience in their muni experience as it is mine. now we will switch back to me. what i want to say one of the main findings in the report is the fact that out of all the transit systems we interviewed only one used switchbacks as muni does to -- >> can i interrupt you and ask you about that? >> yes. >> perhaps i missed it, but can you talk a little bit about the other jurisdictions that you spoke with? >> you know what we're going to have in jack's report -- he's going to talk about how we chose the other jurisdictions. >> great. >> and jack and i interviewed them together and some of the other jurors joined in on the interviews but our selection was based on the controller's report that compared systems and we selected the list from the controller and contacted those systems. we were also told that all of the systems in europe use switchbacks as a tool, so we took advantage of a vacation to contact three systems in paris, and speak to repr
earthquake. we do have a grandson? she was with us in 2009. goopublic works is here. this reminds us of the 3000 people but passed away in 1906 from the devastating earthquake, but the rebirth of our city is with us. i have been in all of these other positions where we are always prepared. and we are already engaged in recovery efforts. we were there with a whole staff. we have six we assure you that when the next big event happens, that water system will be there for us to deliver water with that 24 hours. a huge change from depending on this fountain. we are handing it off to generations of youth in the city to understand -- make sure they're prepared. go to our website, it tells you all the things there. iti is about having those items prepared.w we will survive. that is how we get ready and celebrate and honor the people who left us and make sure our city is ready. thank you for being here. congratulations to our survivors. >> very nice job. behind me is a good friend and a great firechief. you go back 106 years. braxton morning. -- good morning. one of the survivors could not be
>> the meeting will come to order. this is the monday, october 29th, 2012 meeting of the land use and economic development committee of the san francisco board of supervisors. i feel a lot of giants fever still in the air here. over here with the giants colors on. we have three items on the agenda today, but let me first say that our clerk is ms. andrea ausbery. i'm the chair of the committee, eric mar. to my right is vice-chair supervisor malia cohen. we're expecting supervisor scott wiener any moment. could you please give us our announcements? >> yes. please make sure the sounds on all cell phones, electronic devices, speaker cards and comies of documents are included as part of the file to submit to the clerk. items on the november 6 board agenda unless otherwise stated. >> thank you. i'd like to also thank sfgtv for televising us today, especially our staff greg burk and john ross. we have three items on the agenda today. ms. ausbery please call item number 1. >> item number 1, administrative code - port prepayment of jobs-housing linkage program obligations, ordinance amendi
and u.s. technology giants have been fighting each other in the courts over technology for smartphones and other mobile devices. the people at samsung say they added iphone 5, apple's iphone 5 to a patent infringement lawsuit. samsung alleges the latest smartphone violates eight of its patents. the claim targets technologies for displays data and storing photos. lawyers for samsung say they will exclude patents on the high speed wireless communications protocol known as lte. samsung has an edge in this technology. samsung received a green light from a u.s. district court in california in another case. the company can resume sales of its tablet device the galaxy 10.1 in the u.s. market. the court decided in june to temporarily ban sales. it lifted the injunction after a separate lawsuit in august found this particular tablet did not infringe on apple patents. >>> in other news ahmadinejad blamed the enemies of iran for the fall of its currency. u.s. and european leaders imposed sanctions in july to encourage them to abandon the nuclear missions. >> translator: sanctions are used as a ps
>>> disgust and distrust. okinawans react to a case of alleged sexual assault involving u.s. servicemen and wonder how it will affect the realignment of american forces in japan. people in okinawa have lived with u.s. military bases in their backyard for decades. american forces are supposed to protect them, and the rest of japan in the event of a threat. but many okinawans aren't feeling so safe around u.s. servicemen right now. two navy personnel are accused of raping a woman. the case could further strain japan/u.s. security ties. investigators say the men attacked the women before dawn tuesday on a street in the central part of okinawa's main island. they say the suspected raped and injured her and then made off with some of her personal belongings, including her bag, mobile phone, and some of her clothes. the servicemen arrived in okinawa sunday and were supposed to leave for guam tuesday. okinawa governor hirokazu nakaima met john roos at the american embassy in tokyo. nakaima expressed grave concern the matter could irreparably damage trust between okinawa and the u.s
higher rider satisfaction ratings than muni. we found that the use of switchbacks was not a commonly used practice of all systems and rejected by the managers who felt they're an sult to passengers and rather the other systems use variety and easy and low cost practices to ensure rider satisfaction. many are similar to those identified in muni's 2008 effectiveness transit project. unfortunately although it has been resurrected it hasn't been updated and recommendations are only being implemented selectively. thank you. >> thank you. just a quick question and thank you for giving the report and no wonder i recognize you in the hall there. how many jurisdictions did you talk to? >> well, we emailed and talked to people in paris because they did comment on our initial go around that everybody in the world uses switch backs and we can emphatically and categorically tell you it's not a smoothing tool for their systems in france. we talked to the people in seattle and boston and the san jose and santa clara area. am i leaving any out? >> [inaudible] >> and we also talked to bart. >> [
and a dancing together across every conceivable and imaginable difference. i have believed the world looks to us to say it is -- if it is possible to live together across every conceivable difference. we're proud of our home and place in history and proud of our example. but we also are humble in the context of the world we're living in. a world that is another connected but hyper-connected with a merger of i.t. and globalization. we recognize our faith -- fate is connected to the fate of others. that is the spirit that binds us together. the spirit that brings us here today. i want to close by reminding you that california is the birthplace as mayor lee was saying of life science, biotech, the home of the california stem cell institute, a state with more engineers, more scientists, more global -- nobel laureate's than any other state or we still lay claim to five of the top universities based on the shanghai index in the world. caltech, stanford university, and three of our public universities, not least of which the university is a stone's throw away. uc-berkeley campus. we're proud of the sta
and residents facilities to encourage older adults to get more involved with physical activity using technology. we're going to spend the first 30 minutes or so demonstrating the wii. not only will we demonstrate how to use it, but we will doe demonstrate adaptive devices so that it can be an inclusive activity for all adults and children. my name is dr. chris thompson from the university of san francisco. go, dons. 1855. i have not been there that long. i am in the department of exercise and sports science. i think it is a good match for me to be demonstrating the wii, which is a good physical activity. i am joined on the stage by a student, not from usf, but from san francisco state. we actually talk to each other. this is mackenna. >> good morning. >> finally, i am joined by alicia from the independent living center in san francisco. it is great for all of you to be here today. people will be trickling in over the next half hour. we will give you a taste of what wii is like. we have set up the game. i will start by playing mackeena in a game of tennis. the interesting thing about wii is we u
from them and tep and transit effective project and shared with us and compleated in 2008 and list of solutions similar to those proposed by transportation consultants with whom we spoke. the muni managers we finally did speak with shared the fact that the 2008tep plan has been halted to budgetary concerns and was now only being partially implemented. in our report we acknowledge the resurrection of 2008tep as a step forward from muni and encouraged the expansion of it to speed up muni and ways to avoid switchbacks. in summary the 2011-2012 grand jury conducted a survey of other systems and four of which had higher rider satisfaction ratings than muni. we found that the use of switchbacks was not a commonly used practice of all systems and rejected by the managers who felt they're an sult to passengers and rather the other systems use variety and easy and low cost practices to ensure rider satisfaction. many are similar to those identified in muni's 2008 effectiveness transit project. unfortunately although it has been resurrected it hasn't been updated and recommendations are on
>> let me just ask you. there seems to be a disagreement about the use of switch backs and maybe you can talk from your point of view why you use them and let's start with that. >> okay. i think in terms of knowing -- we don't get up in the morning and say we have a goal to switchbacks. they're service management technique or tactic to make adjustment to recover from a significant delay and for us, and this is when we talked about the grand jury report when we first were briefed on it our concern was this was a lost opportunity, a lost opportunity to talk about muni service. in other words, what are the things that cause delays? what are the things we need to be doing to improve on time performance from crew reliability? what are the specific actions? what are the specific things? that's what we wanted to have. the higher the on time performance the less runs that are missed, the less vehicles break down, there is a less of a need for switchbacks. switchbacks are a symptom to us or a tactic, not part of the problem, so when do we use them? we use them when you have a sign
, it is something that we have talked about. it is important for us to understand what the cbos are doing. it is important for them to have specific training for their individuals. they should also have some guidelines and some criteria to evaluate their successes, on a quarterly and yearly basis. >> thank you. last question. what are the types of job opportunities that are available for at risk youth? what are the funding opportunities? >> there are not many job opportunities right now. with the way that funding is currently, it is only being reduced. what we try to do is think creative. we try to create an internship programs, where we try to confuse -- infuse youth. we utilize a lot of non-western ways of trying to have youth identified. we infuse political education so they can make a good choice. there are other programs like oasis. there are not many opportunities, not everybody could work -- all the work permits required. it also requires a social security number. alternative pathways are a good way to go, such as those internship opportunities. use these venues as an opportunity t
be able to prescribe it for medicinal use. being out here, the concept is still controversial and it's confusing to many people. here to talk about it is dr. julie how land. she's an assistant professor of psychiatry at ny university of medicine and also the author of "the pot book:the complete guide to cankacannabis." welcome to the show. >> thank you. >> there are states where this is already allowed, medicinal marijuana use. what do doctors really typically i prescribe marijuana for? are there certain conditions, and how do people know what those conditions are? >> well, the -- you know, the main indications for using medicinal cannabis are to reduce nash ya and stimulate appetite. it can also be used for chronic pain. it's particularly good for neuropath iic pain, the pins and needles that the opioids aren't good at treating and a good muscle relaxer and helps quite a bit with autoimmune disorders, regulates the immune systems. so it can be used for a whole host of medical indications and psychiatric indications as well. >> it's interesting. the tagli line when you think about it
announcements for us? >> yes, please turn off all cell phones and electronic devices, copies and any documents that should be part of the file should be submitted to the clerk, they will appear on the october 16, 2012 board of supervisor's agenda, unless otherwise stated. >> colleagues, item number 1 i'm not going to call just yet, they wanted to be here and present and answer questions, but they have a conflict at this moment, he will be later on in the meeting, item number 2? >> the resolution authorizing the director of public works to authorize the direct to have of public works to execute an amendment to the construction management services agreement with cooper pugeda management inc. for the laguna honda hospital replacement program. >> good morning, chair chu, john thomas, project manager for the laguna honda hospital replacement program, you have modification before you to increase the contract from 16.196 million to 16.805 million dollars to provide construction management service to the remodel of the h wing, which is the existing facility at laguna honda hospital, work has been und
or whatever, that is not in conflict with what you're doing? >> no. >> it's not a conflict for us. >> are you open year-round, and do you have a brochure? >> yes! [laughter] >> i think it's interesting, because we've just been through a session on judaism - the ancient myths and rituals stories - and both starhawk and margot adler - came out of intellectual, atheistic, radical jewish families. they are, in a sense, the contemporary flowering of judaism, in the sense that they are returning to very ancient roots, that old rock upon which all the world's religions, i believe, have been based. >> now which changes not. >> huh? >> now which changes not. >> ah, yes. >> well, the jewish tradition, in other words, is fulfilled in both margot adler and starhawk - they're both jewish. >> yes. >> that's the point i made. >> yeah, and i think that does also fit - back with judaism, we were talking about different interpretations of the genesis story, the alienation story, and i love your myth about leaving the fires, leaving it and going out and becoming, so that more relationship could happen, more int
identifies them. only using that name can they communicate back and forth. without trying to trace it back to the original tipster, it's not possible. >> it's an authentication as well. the original tipster is going to give me as a detective i know six months down the line this is the same person telling me something earlier. >> we delete information as soon as we get it. we do not store logs of anything that's identifiable either. >> is there a danger of a private company getting the tip first? i think that's interesting that you get it first which protects the tipster but it is also interesting that you have your hands on the information first before the police agency. >> you mean is it a danger that we're holding that information? >> just because it isn't a police agency. >> we deal with sensitive information. the other half of our business is doing notifications and we have a long history of dealing with this type of information. our servers are housed in incredibly high security data centers. the same data centers that have police data as well. we guard that information extremely jeal
and the use is not changing from what it's been but the use is not technically what they have been asking for. they need the approval by us to have their use to conform to what we're doing as opposed to the previous cu which was more limited -- although the distinction sometimes is rather vague because we went through the same thing at westportal and the proprietor suffered a fire and not in business anymore but we went through conditions in that case had real specifications and you will only have so many chairs and strict conditions. i don't remember in 2005 -- there could be 20 people have a wine tasting at the same time under the approval of 2005. i can't recall a specific limitation on the tasting going on, but with that being said there is a lot of local support for it. there are some people speaking against it again and there are a couple neighborhood groups just recently come out against it. they may not have been in support at any time but recently we're hearing they're opposing it, but you always have to make a distinction between the neighborhood groups and do a lot of good thin
at the future. we are taking a look at some of the most exciting technologies in elevators. george, tell us about destination elevators. >> this is the technology of the future. probably the biggest single investment in elevators. san francisco has embraced the technology more than any other city in the country. a big advantage with us is passengers get to their floors sooner and there is more opportunity of customization of features for individual service. four issues of security and accessibility, this is a big advantage over traditional elevators. digest i understand these are rehabilitated upgrades of existing elevators? >> yes, these are upgrades to the original elevators from 1980. all the controls and wiring has changed but the physical mechanisms are the same. >> how much energy to these use? >> with all of the things that we did hear, energy savings is about 50% from where we started. that is a significant improvement for such a major system. >> tell me how it works. >> this is the hall keypad, which controls the elevator. the system asks where you are going before you get into the
a wonderful experiment for us. as you know, we have been working to create not only public garages but also in congested neighborhoods. when a private company like bmw registers their interest in car- sharing, that is a complement to the direction we are heading to be morris -- more sustainable. i want to think bmw for being here. we are in negotiations to get us into our fleet so we can utilize. unless we do it with the latest technology, people will not appreciate the mayor driving a bmw. [laughter] but we are doing it for the right reasons. i want to showcase that as we lead this country into a thought process, a challenge that our major cities, our urban settings can have solutions to our parking problems, have sustainable mobility as part of our alternatives in the vehicles and car-sharing as a principle for us to join our automobile makers as well as our vehicle owners and rentals as we challenge the public to say there are better choices coming forward with our partners in the industry. thank you, bmw. i know that ian and his team are here to announce this thing but i wanted to thank
have never used any products from the new england compounding center. epidural had been a standard for any relief. >> depends on the preference of the doctor, how easy it is and the way we were trained. i was trained to mix my medication by myself. i don't use compounded medication, but there's nothing wrong with using compounded medication. the only draw back, which is causing the scare now in the public is the infection. >> swouns wednesday again, we want -- once again we want top stress none of the med star hospitals has used it. seven centers have used the epidurals for pain treatment. go to our website abc2news.com for more information. >>> in august we told you about an internet scam that locks up your computer allowing scammers to demand a random to fix it. that is back and now they are using a state agency to try to fool you with it. you suffer the web thinking no one is looking over your shoulder but scammers want you to believe big brother is minding your business. >> it's scary. >> reporter: frightening because this scam involves con artists claiming to be with the state
neighborhood of seattle, washington. his parents immigrated to the u.s. from china and the 1930's. his father fought in world war ii and worked as a cook. he passed away when the mayor was 15. his mother was a seamstress and a waitress. mayor lee has five siblings, he graduated from college in maine, he also went to uc- berkeley law school and finished in 1978. he and his wife have two daughters. i also want to mention, prior to becoming mayor, one of the key points in his contributions to the community is after he completed law school, he worked as a managing attorney for the san francisco asian law caucus, where he was an advocate for affordable housing and the rights of immigrants and renters. mayor lee -- [applause] >> thank you. welcome to city hall. the people's city hall, san francisco. i want you all to note that that was such a wonderful rendition of our national anthem. please give another applause to the millennium -- melanie and her daughter. i am so excited about all of you and seen so many of you from all over our state. come to city hall anin san francisco, welcome. i would lik
. there is a circus company that i have been fortunate enough to work with the last couple of years. i use elements of dance and choreography and combine that with theater techniques. a lot of the work is content- based, has a strong narrative. the dancers have more of a theatrical feel. i think we are best known for our specific work. in the last 15 years, spending a lot of time focusing on issues that affect us and are related to the african-american experience, here in the united states. i had heard of marcus shelby and had been in join his work but never had the opportunity to meet him. we were brought together by the equal justice society specifically for this project. we were charged with beginning work. marquez and i spent a lot of time addressing our own position on the death penalty, our experiences with people who had been incarcerated, family members, friends of friends. pulling our information. beyond that, we did our own research. to create a picture that resonated with humanity. it is the shape of a house. in this context, it is also small and acts like a cell. i thought that was an i
, and our country has presented, a challenge to us for our seniors and the need for long-term care. we're going to be working closely with the long term care coordinating council. thank you, tracy. [applause] thank you for stepping up. and for teaching me how to pronounce your name. our mta newest member to the board of directors and one that i know will be of great value to us as we are challenged with everybody being able to enjoy all the services our mta has. thank you, christina, for stepping up. [applause] as we move into the times when we want more people to come in, we want development to create jobs, we need to make sure we appropriately plan all areas of the city. i want to thank these two gentlemen for stepping up to come and spend hours of their personal time helping us with the planning of the city. michael, thank you for returning and stepping forward for the planning commission. richard, thank you very much for stepping up as well. some say the most voluble land we have -- valuable land we have for people to live and enjoy is the waterfront. i want to thank our newest
of us, or none of us, and that is the bottom line. it has to be that mentality. >> it is a way to control the prisoners. it takes the pressure off the guards and everybody else. they say we want to stop violence, but you promote a violence by segregating. when an individual comes, the first in the asking, where are you from? what is your nationality? that is how to divide and conquer. that is the way the united states is made up. that is how you work. north and south vietnam, for instance. they divide people so that the pressure will not be on them. that is how i see the system. i see it in prison, how they divide inmates. it is scary if inmates unite, and they do not like that. when i first come to prison, it will be a big thing if i went and sat with the blacks. it would be a big think if they caucasian sat with the asians. we only did that one time, where everybody got together, and we got what we wanted. when you unite, you can conquer. [applause] >> next question is for the commander. how can they community-based organization contact the task force for speaking engagements
saving these buildings and the importance of us doo this well and coordinating with the rest of pier 70. what we're doing is rehabilitating the six buildings, the office buildings, the two on the northern side will be used as office and doing different things that the steel company did but used in the same manner and this power house building to commercial use and the south side of 20th street extension of the economy in the area right now and light industrial, arts and recreation and the things that are making that a cool hot new area and we can accommodate that growth. we think this will be jobs for 400 to 500 people. one of the things to recognize this project is important to the port for quite a while. a decade ago we were in contract with other entities to do this and tried to make this project happen. we carry $109 million in the capital plan to do these buildings. we have a project before you today where the orden development group would take the lead and invest their funds and realize this. one of the reasons -- the high level reasons we think this can succeed a
the women. so we created the female engagement team. with our interagency partners, the u.s. department of state, danish and british governments and of course the afghans, additionally we reached out to the private sector for partnerships, and not for profits to deliver things that we weren't capable of delivering or to cover gaps that arose as we implemented the plan. we implemented the plan through 17 teams through helman and our two female engagement teams. this is actually just scrolling pictures. sometimes a picture says a thousand words and i don't want to take you down the whole history of a year but i wanted to talk to you about how we framed this plan. this plan was framed into 5 pillars and the 5 pillars were students and parents, we attempted to build buy in and assure safety among the students. there was lots of fear of reprisals. by sending your kids to school there was fear that the taliban was going to knock on your door and let you know that that wasn't allowed. previously the taliban had instituted a medrossas so their only forms of education were religious schools
command air control. those are operations that are familiar to us and they are, it's a great exercise for us tactically as well. we are able to integrate with cal fire itself with the objective being the fire itself. those work out for us here and we can go ahead and use those skills forward as well. thank you very much, we appreciate the opportunity. >> thank you, i'd like to thank our panelists and open it up to our group for any questions of our panelists today. yes, sir, secretary. >> there are a lot of things you can do in a forest that tend to make it easier it fight a fire like most importantly burning off the fuel during the wet season so there's less for the fire to feed on. to what extent in cal fire and all your other things do you encourage people to do things in their forest when you don't have a fire that make it easier and more effective in fighting the fire? >> it's an excellent question, sir. we spend a large time in cal fire on public education and prevention and also with respect to you were talking about fuel, the fuels program, or vegetation manage
is that it produces carbon free public power to the city of san francisco. one of my favorite lines mike just used is this measure is about consolidating from 8 reservoirs to 7. another way to say that is to say this is about draining one of them, the hetch hetchy valley. have other studies said this is feasible? sure, just like tearing down city hall or knocking down the golden gate bridge, that's possible but not feasible. we're not going to spend 3 billion dollars to tear down the hetch hetchy dam. let's not forget, we are also stewards for two dozen cities in the peninsula. over 2 million californians benefit from the foresight of our forefathers almost 100 years ago in building hetch hetchy. while the rest of the state is tying themselves up in knots trying to figure out where to get their water. not only did we have the type of water storage hetch hetchy provides, not only today but in the future, we are in a solid place. and to spend this kind of money, and let's just talk about the $8 million dollars, i think that's one thing we can agree on. this calls for us to spend $8 million do
. >>> well on come to wourd wide exchange. as is an decide barrels towards the east code, u.s. authorities order thousands to evacuate for the the biggest storm. >> my first message is to all the people across the eastern seaboard atlantic going north that you need to take this very seriously. >> all u.s. stock markets will be closed today. its first weather related closures in 27 years. and shares in ubs rise in the open after reports swiss bank may cut 10,000 investment banking jobs and wind down up to 15 trading businesses. police wen and his family fight back. their lawyers call it untrue and are considering legal action against the "new york times." for our u.s. viewers, the show will be on just one hour this week because europes has gone off daylight savings time, so we're just four hours ahead now of new york time. hurricane sandy is also still several hours away from make landfall, but the impact of the storm is already being felt. transportation has ground to a halt as new york and other major eastern cities have shut down mass transit, airlines canceling flights and
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